Workshop Wednesday: Airbrushing Torch

You’ve seen my recent work with airbrushes, both with Karchev as well as the Bombardiers. This week I set myself up with a little bit more practice with airbrushing, specifically more salt weathering. Just a short workshop wednesday this week folks; not a lot of process shots and I’ve gone through the salt weathering method before as well.

Like all my previous airbrush works, I’ve realised how obscenely important it is to keep all the pieces in as many seperate sets as possible. Unlike normal painting where you usually do subassemblies and paint a jack in at most 2-3 pieces, the airbrush likes all the bits seperate. This enables both finer control over where you get to place your paint (and subsequently shadows and highlights), but also means that you can go with dual-toned models without excessive use of masking.

I also went with a heckuva lot of salt weathering this time; because

1) Torch is immune to corrosion, so I imagined him running full tilt into acid and rain, the paint sloughing off but not affecting him in any way and
2) I wanted a bigger contrast than the weathering on Karchev.

And really, after the airbrushing and weathering, all that was left were the metals and details, which painted up quickly enough.

I don’t think Torch is my best work (the brush still provides the finest degree of control) but man it’s really great to have such a nice model painted in about half the time that I would usuallty have used.

Here Be Your Comments

comments