Marjorie Liu, Sana Takeda and Monstress win big at the 2018 Eisners

Huge congratulations to Marjorie Liu and Sana Takeda for winning their first Eisner Awards at this year’s ceremony, which is almost over.

Marjorie and Sana won for their critically-acclaimed ongoing series Monstress, published by Image Comics.

This historic win makes Marjorie the first woman ever to win Best Writer in the Awards’ 30-year history. She gave a heartfelt acceptance speech, paying tribute to her grandparents.

Sana Takeda also won her first Eisners for Best Cover Artist and Best Painter/Multimedia Artist (interior art). She becomes the first woman of colour and only the second woman to win Best Cover Artist, having been nominated last year but losing to Fiona Staples.

Sana was not present at the Awards ceremony, so Marjorie accepted both Awards on her behalf.

Monstress also won the Eisner for Best Publication for Teens as well as the big prize for Best Continuing Series, sweeping all 5 of the Awards they were nominated for this year. Marjorie was clearly overwhelmed with emotion as she got on stage for the fifth time, but also surprised everyone by getting Sana on Facetime!

This clean sweep is a huge vindication for the incredible work the creative team of Marjorie and Sana have been doing for the past three years. They are two women of colour who created a world full of women of colour and the overwhelmingly positive response from readers worldwide has been extremely well-deserved. 

Monstress had previously been nominated for many of the same categories in 2016 and 2017, but did not go home with any Awards.

Marjorie’s win for Best Writer was also historic as it was the first time there was a tie-victory in this Eisner category. Batman writer Tom King also won Best Writer. King had previously won two Eisner Awards last year for Best Short Story and Best Limited Series.

Congratulations to Marjorie, Sana and all the Eisner Award winners this year!

(Image credit: @marjoriemliu, Twitter)

About Korgath

His teenage years spent nursing a giant man-crush on Steve Rogers, the first Captain America, Peter naturally found himself drawn to many other heroes who depicted strong, manly qualities, including the honour-bound warrior Worf, first Klingon in Starfleet, and the muscular rock hard abs of The Thing.

Here Be You Leaving Comments